Android Nougat‬ Wiki

Google has announced the official name for its next major Android version: Nougat. But it looks like Google announced it on Snapchat using an iPhone.

Android N (currently in Developer Preview status) is now Android Nougat! It’s the 12th nicknamed version of Android and will be released to the public in the fall of 2016. Here’s everything you need to know so far!

If you had to boil what a major release of Android (or any operating system) means to just a single acronym, it’d be this: APIs. That’s short for Application Program Interface, and it’s what allows apps to do, well, anything. There are a ton of new ones coming in Android N, and we’ve only gotten a small taste thus far. More should be announced as we get new preview builds.

Some, however, are more anticipated than others.


This is the big one we’ve been waiting for. Multi-window support — that is, two apps running side by side on the same display — was hidden deep within the first Android M preview in 2015, before being unceremoniously removed in a subsequent build. It was never really meant for public consumption, nor was it ever really publicly mentioned.

That is, until Google released the Pixel C tablet in late 2015. It’s a bit of an odd product with an odd 1√2 aspect ratio — the same as a standard sheet of paper. That lets you fold it in half and have the same aspect ratio — perfect for running apps side by side.

Only, the Pixel C launched without that feature. So it was pretty clear then that we’d probably see multi-window with the N release in 2016. And we now have it. And not just on tablets — it works on phones as well. This is going to be one feature that developers need to take a look at very quickly.

Multi-window will be available for phones and tablets. On the Nexus Player, apps will run picture-in-picture. And Google says “manufacturers of larger devices” (note that it doesn’t say tablets or TVs or what) will have access to a “freeform” mode that lets the user scale apps however they want in addition to side-by-side multi-window.

We’ve been able to interact with notifications for a good long while now. Not every app supports this, but look at Gmail as an early example. Pull down the notification, and archive an email without actually having to open it. Brilliant.

Google Hangouts took this a step further, allowing you to reply to messages right from the notification try, without having to open the app, or the message itself. It’s slick.

You’ll now be able to have bundled notifications. Or, rather, better bundled notifications. Think off it as more information in one place. Have a half-dozen emails come in through Gmail? You’ll be able to see more subject lines at one time in the notification area.